WELCOME TO NORDIC INSTITUTE OF DENTAL MATERIALS

NIOM works to ensure that dental biomaterials are safe and effective. We undertake research, participate in standardization and provide clinical relevant advice to the dental health services and health authorities in the Nordic countries. NIOM offers research-based consultancy and accredited testing according to international standards. Our independent test laboratory delivers accurate and independent data accepted for third-party evaluations of dental materials and instruments.

THIS IS OUR MISSION

NEWS

“Many questions, much praise”

“Many questions, much praise”

Such reads the headline in the March edition of The Norwegian Dental Journal, referring to NIOM’s first webinar, held February 14th. The journal was in the room as 100 participants logged on across all the Nordic countries, observing, as the webinar was held and the follow-up article reveals more details, such as more background into why NIOM offers webinars, plans for the future and feedback from the participants post-event.
NIOM kicks off in Cologne: IDS 2017

NIOM kicks off in Cologne: IDS 2017

Four representatives from NIOM are heading to IDS 2017. They excited to meet colleagues and fellow professionals at the NIOM seminar at the Hyatt Regency Hotel tonight.

NEWSLETTERS

Substantial variations in light curing procedures

Reported data is scarce on light curing times of restorations and irradiance of the curing devices used. In this study we sought to improve the knowledge of such parameters as total light dose applied to a restoration layer and the total potential exposure to reflected light to the dentist’s eyes during a workday. read more

Repair or replace

Repair is the best treatment for defective restorations, most dentists in Norway argue. In a questionnaire study from NIOM and University of Oslo, up to 90 % of the respondents favoured repair rather than replacement of the restoration. read more

Success in light curing

Welcome to our webinar on May 30th. In this webinar our Head of Laboratory, Hilde M. Kopperud, will present topics on light curing techniques and discuss how to avoid pitfalls when buying a new curing lamp. read more

NEWSLETTERS

Substantial variations in light curing procedures

Reported data is scarce on light curing times of restorations and irradiance of the curing devices used. In this study we sought to improve the knowledge of such parameters as total light dose applied to a restoration layer and the total potential exposure to reflected light to the dentist’s eyes during a workday. read more
Repair or replace

Repair or replace

Repair is the best treatment for defective restorations, most dentists in Norway argue. In a questionnaire study from NIOM and University of Oslo, up to 90 % of the respondents favoured repair rather than replacement of the restoration. read more
Success in light curing

Success in light curing

Welcome to our webinar on May 30th. In this webinar our Head of Laboratory, Hilde M. Kopperud, will present topics on light curing techniques and discuss how to avoid pitfalls when buying a new curing lamp. read more

RESEARCH

Read about our research activities.

READ MORE

PUBLICATIONS

Kemiske stoffers skadevirkninger på tandklinikker (Side effects of chemical compounds used in dental clinics)

The work at a dental clinic implies getting in contact with different chemical substances, which may cause temporary or permanent injury to the staff, primarily allergic reactions, but also local irritation, carcinogenic or toxic effects. Dentists and dental assistants belong to the professional groups most frequently experiencing work-related eczema. The chemical substances may originate from dental materials, such as mercury from amalgam and monomers from resin based materials. The substances may be released during preparation, polishing and removal of restorations. In addition, different biocides/chemical disinfectants are used for both clinical an infection control purposes. Finally, medical gloves contain allergenic latex protein and rubber chemicals and may cause irritant eczema. Basically, damages can be prevented by substitution of hazardous substances, the choice of approved products, compliance with set threshold limits and thorough planning of the work considering health aspects including the preparation of local guidelines. As development of injury follows either direct contact or inhalation of chemical substances, the damage can be prevented by measures such as the use of “no touch technique”, high-volume evacuation reducing spatter and aerosol formation and proper use of personal protective equipment in the form of protective gloves and eyewear and surgical masks. (Article in Danish)

Brug af fysiske værnemidler på tandklinikker (Use of physical protective equipment at dental clinics)

Members of the dental team are exposed daily to biological, chemical and physical agents. These vary for example, from microorganisms to noise, and are present in forms as diverse as aerosols and gasses. National and international directives, legislation and guidelines for infection control, and occupational health issues intended for the dental clinic, govern the physical and other types of protection required. In addition, it is important to be acquainted with the justification for any specific protective item, when and when not to use it and when an upgrade is required. Examples are the purchase of new instruments and equipment or the outbreak of epidemics of new or altered microorganisms that require a new or a different type of protection. It is important to adapt the use of personal protection to an acceptable and practical level that includes the entire dental team. Occupational health education should be introduced at an early stage in the curriculum of the dental team. User competence in using personal protection must be ensured when new equipment is acquired. This article presents the types of exposure agents most frequently met in the dental clinic and the corresponding physical and other personal protection devices that should or may be used. (Article in Danish)

Bacterial biofilm elimination using gold nanorod localised surface plasmon resonance generated heat

Bacterial biofilm elimination using gold nanorod localised surface plasmon resonance generated heat. Highlights: A technique for antibiotic replacement using heat for biofilm elimination is proposed. Gold nanorods exhibit localised surface plasmon resonance upon optical irradiation and when relaxing, absorbed energy is dissipated as heat, which is utilized to kill bacteria. After 5 minutes of near infrared irradiation an average of 71% of early biofilms were eliminated.

LABORATORIES

NIOM TESTED

NIOM has established a programme for the quality evaluation of a number of dental products. The evaluation is based on testing of the products according to methods in relevant ISO and other standards, or according to other well-established and documented test methods. Products fulfilling the set requirements are granted permission to use the NIOM TESTED quality seal. The NIOM TESTED quality seal confirms that the product meets the requirements specified by NIOM.