Antibacterial and Antibiofilm Effect of Low Viscosity Chitosan against Stapylococcus epidermides -

The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial and antibiofilm properties of low viscosity chitosan on S. epidermidis growth and biofilm formation.

Evaluation of material suitability for nanoparticle-based coatings and further antimicrobial treatment -

Dental materials are easily colonized by bacteria, and microbial attack is the main cause of dental implant failure and periodontitis. The aim of this project was to formulate nanoparticle-based (NPsol) coatings that reduce bacterial adherence on materials used in dentistry. Pre-treatment of the surfaces with such coatings could create a time window that allows for killing of the surrounding bacteria prior to or shortly after adhesion. One option is to apply antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT).

Chitosan – antibacterial use in dental materials -

Secondary caries is the primary reason for replacement of composite fillings, and clinical studies report more secondary caries when composites are used compared to amalgam in high-risk caries groups. This highlights the need for development of materials that will reduce or inhibit biofilm formation on dental materials.

Techniques for studying biofilm -

The oral cavity is one of the human habitats with the highest diversity of bacterial species. It is estimated to be over 700 bacterial species that are capable of residing in this habitat. Bacteria were long thought of living as free floating, planktonic cells. However, it has become clear that the preferred form of living is in a biofilm.

Chitosan – antibacterial use in dental materials -

Chitosan is produced commercially from crab and shrimp shell wastes with different degrees of deacetylation and molecular masses. Because of chitosan’s promising biological activities, including non-toxicity and antimicrobial activity, it is used for a variety of purposes in food production, medicine, agriculture, cosmetics, and biotechnology.