Effect of chlorhexidine digluconate on antimicrobial activity, cell viability and physicochemical properties of three endodontic sealers -

The main hypothesis of the study as rejected as exposure to CHX affected sealers’ properties. CHX in contact
with sealer surfaces improved the antibacterial properties of the sealer leachates and reduced cell viability for all sealer leachates, except for freshly mixed PCS. Among the tested sealers, BioRoot RCS leachates presented the highest antibacterial properties and cell viability with and without CHX contact.

Fabrication techniques and ion release in cobalt-chromium alloys -

A recent study tested the behaviour of cobalt-chromium alloys under corrosive conditions mimicking the acidity observed in oral biofilm. Cobalt-chromium has become the alloy of choice for the framework of porcelain-fixed-to-metal (PFM) prosthetics also in combination with titanium implants. The alloy specimens were fabricated by both traditional casting, by milling and by laser melting and sintering.

Cobalt–chromium alloys fabricated with four different techniques: Ion release, toxicity of released elements and surface roughness -

The aim of the study was to investigate the metal ion release, surface roughness and cytoxicity for Co–Cr alloys produced by different manufacturing techniques before and after heat treatment. In addition, to evaluate if the combination of materials affects the ion release.

In Vitro Effects of Dental Monomer Exposure – Dependence on the Cell Culture Model -

Methacrylate monomers are major components of resin-based biomaterials. The polymerization of these materials is never complete, and methacrylates leaking from cured materials cause exposure of patients. Only some selected methacrylates have thoroughly been tested for possible interaction with living cells. In the current study, we compared the effects of 2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate (HEMA; a carefully studied methacrylate) […]

Effects of Nrf2 signaling on cytotoxicity induced by HEMA from dental biomaterials -

INTRODUCTION Resin-based biomaterials used in dentistry consist of methacrylate monomers that are polymerized in situ. The conversion to polymer is never complete and cause patient exposure to electrophilic monomers such as 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA). In addition, dental personnel are exposed through handling of uncured materials. In vitro, methacrylates are reported to be cytotoxic in a […]