Antimicrobial and physicochemical characterization of endodontic sealers after exposure to chlorhexidine digluconate -

The primary aim of root canal treatment of teeth with apical periodontitis is to eliminate the microbial load from the root canal system and promote periapical healing. Meticulous mechanical debridement of the root canal system significantly reduces the bacterial load and is considered important in canal disinfection. However, complete elimination of all microorganisms is challenging, as viable bacteria potentially remain on the dentin walls and inside dentinal tubules, both in planktonic forms and biofilms. About 35% of the root canal area is left untouched when conventional rotary and hand instruments are used. Therefore, disinfection with irrigation solutions during root-canal treatment and thereafter obturation of the root canal are important factors to reduce the amount and growth of residual bacteria.

Antibacterial Activity of Endodontic Sealers against Planktonic Bacteria and Bacteria in Biofilms. -

Antibacterial activity of 4 endodontic sealers against bacteria planktonic grown or in biofilms commonly detected from persistent and secondary endodontic infections.
Investigating the antibacterial activity of endodontic sealers and materials against bacteria in biofilms is highly important to evaluate the materials’ ability to eradicate bacteria from the infected root canal