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Abstract

OBJECTIVE:
A resin-bonded prosthesis is preferred when conservation of abutment tooth structure is required, although a problem with such systems is bonding between the fixed partial denture material and a polymer pontic. The aim of this study was to investigate the bond strength of a silica glass-fiber-reinforced composite to polymer teeth compared with the bond strength of a proprietary heat-polymerized denture base polymer and also between a layer of the polymerized matrix polymer of the experimental base material and an additional layer of the same material.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:
Polymeric artificial maxillary incisors and two heat-polymerized base materials (ProBase Hot and an experimental formulation) were used. Three test groups (each n=6) were prepared: bonding between artificial tooth and an experimental composite (group-TC), bonding between tooth and ProBase Hot (group-TP), and bonding between experimental base material and experimental base material (group-BB). The content of inorganic particles of teeth was determined by combustion analysis. The bond strengths were measured in shear with a universal testing machine and the data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and post-hoc Scheffé test (p<0.05). After failure, the fracture surfaces were examined by optical microscopy.

RESULTS:
The content of inorganic particles in the teeth was low. There is no statistically significant difference in bond strength between the groups.

CONCLUSIONS:
Bond strength of the experimental composite to artificial polymer teeth was as good as that of a conventional heat-polymerized denture base polymer. The strong bonding between the experimental material and artificial teeth makes this combination suitable for resin-bonded prostheses.


Reference
Bond strength between a silica glass-fiber-reinforced composite and artificial polymer teeth.
Meriç G1, Ruyter IE.
Acta Odontol Scand.
 2007 Oct;65(5):306-12.