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Abstract

The ages of 6,761 restorations replaced in permanent teeth, 6,088 in adults > or =19 years of age and 673 in adolescents < or =18 years, were available for analyses. The results showed that the median age of amalgam restorations in adults was 11 years and that of resin-based composite restorations 8 years. This difference in longevity was significant (P = 0.000 l). The median age of failed conventional glass ionomer restorations in adults was 4 years and for resin-modified glass ionomer 2 years. In adolescents, the median longevity of failed amalgam restorations was 5 years and that of composite restorations 3 years, while both types of glass ionomers had a median longevity of 2 years. The data were subdivided based on clinician gender and practice setting. The results showed that the median age of amalgam and composite restorations replaced Its male clinicians was higher than that for female clinicians irrespective of clinical setting. The median age of amalgam and composite restorations replaced by salaried dentists was significantly lower than that by private practitioners. Minor differences were noted in longevity of restorations between male and female patients. The age of replaced restorations was shortest for the group of clinicians with the least clinical experience and highest for those that graduated > or = 30 years ago.

Reference

Age of restorations at replacement in permanent teeth in general dental practice.
Mjör IA, Dahl JE, Moorhead JE.